VMware jumps in with disaster recovery service for hybrid cloud set

Virtualisation giant VMware has announced ‘VMware vCloud Hybrid Service – Disaster Recovery’, a service which provides a continuously available recovery site if a VMware data centre hits the skids.

The system, which promises an RPO (recovery point objective) of 15 minutes, offers 1 terabyte of storage from a minimum pricing point of $835 a month, with the service available in all five of VMware’s vCloud Hybrid Service data centres in the US and UK.

The overall effect is that VMware has joined the disaster recovery game head first, with the virtualisation biz offering ease of access, security and cost with ‘a simple, automated process for replicating and recovering critical applications and data in a warm standby environment at a fraction of the cost of duplicating infrastructure or maintaining an active tertiary data centre.’

“We continue to aggressively execute our hybrid cloud vision, delivering capabilities like DR that businesses can use to extend and protect their existing IT investment to the cloud,” said Bill Fathers, SVP and GM at VMware’s hybrid cloud services business unit in a statement.

He added: “VMware continues to distinguish itself from other cloud providers by making disaster recovery simple and cost-effective, allowing our customers to use a hybrid cloud approach to deliver business value, without wrestling with operational complexity and incompatibility inherent to other public clouds.”

Earlier this week CloudTech spoke with HP on its disaster recovery toolset, with the most intriguing feature being capability both for and from the cloud – in other words, you don’t have to be a cloud user to enjoy the benefits of the service.

Disaster recovery is seldom out of the news, especially with both the NSA and Healthcare.gov security issues. Paige Leidig, SVP of cloud information protector CipherCloud, admitted to CloudTech back in November that the NSA revelations helped the company grow “tremendously.”

For now, while HP might want to disagree with VMware’s glowing assessment of its own product, but it’s good to see another big vendor move enthusiastically into disaster recovery.

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