SD-WAN infrastructure market to hit $4.5bn by 2022, says IDC

The software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN) market continues to grow rapidly – and IDC is predicting the overall infrastructure market will be worth $4.5 billion (£3.53bn) by 2022.

The figure, which appears in the analyst firm’s latest SD-WAN Infrastructure Forecast, takes into account the significant uptick in SD-WAN investment, with infrastructure revenues going up 83.3% in 2017 to reach $833 million.

Another report, IDC’s Market Share – the first from the company for this category...

By James Bourne, 13 August 2018, 0 comments. Categories: Data & Analytics, Infrastructure, Regulation.

Cloud ubiquity could see the term die off by 2025, argues Citrix

Many in the industry have wondered about when the cloud will dissipate – in other words, when the term ceases to be used because of the technology’s ubiquity. Citrix has stuck its head over the parapet – and said that 2025 may signal the death of the buzzword.

At least, that’s the verdict of a quarter of the 750 UK-based IT decision makers polled by Citrix, alongside Censuswide. Of the 26% who believe the term cloud will be obsolete by 2025, more than half (56%) see cloud technology as...

By James Bourne, 30 July 2018, 0 comments. Categories: Data & Analytics, Regulation, Research.

The top five reasons for a multi-cloud infrastructure

Having been focused in the cloud sector for more than 12 years now, I have experienced much fast paced change and continued assumptions, misunderstanding and over-promising of cloud as the saviour of all ills.

Cloud is used as a generic term and yet covers a wide plethora of sub form factors (SaaS – software as a service, PaaS – platform as a service and IaaS – infrastructure as a service) and delivery mechanisms (private, public and hybrid clouds). Within these you then have a growing...

By Ian Moyse, 19 March 2018, 0 comments. Categories: IaaS, Infrastructure, Regulation, SaaS , Security, Software.

How hybrid, multi-cloud and community clouds are coming together for the best of all worlds

What you look for in a cloud provider depends to a large extent on the drivers and challenges that you are experiencing.

People with large legacy estates, for instance, tend to be looking for a hybrid cloud solution that can support both their old legacy workloads and their new cloud ones. Some see this as a transitional arrangement to cover the period in which workloads are migrated to the cloud, but many realise that there are certain workloads for which migration will never be either technologically...

By Bill Mew, 16 February 2018, 0 comments. Categories: Hybrid, Infrastructure, PublicSector, Regulation, Software.

UKCloud partnership with Microsoft and Cisco pushes forward multi-cloud for public sector

UKCloud has announced a collaboration with Microsoft and Cisco to provide what is claimed to be the UK’s only implementation of Microsoft Azure Stack dedicated to the public sector.

The company says it is moving its focus from ‘public cloud for public sector’ to becoming ‘multi-cloud experts’, as organisations progress from initial cloud deployments. Through Cisco as an OEM partner, companies can use Azure alongside other platforms, such as Oracle, VMware, and OpenStack.

As analyst firm...

By James Bourne, 14 February 2018, 0 comments. Categories: CIO, Government, Infrastructure, PublicSector, Regulation.

More organisations opting not to calculate cloud ROI, ISACA finds

An interesting series of findings from ISACA in its latest report: almost one in three organisations polled are not calculating return on investment in their cloud computing initiatives.

The findings, which appear in a report titled ‘How Enterprises Are Calculating Cloud ROI – And Why Some Enterprises Are Moving Ahead Without It’, reveal how companies are increasingly moving away from the ROI model. “If ROI is not calculated in advance of implementation, it becomes difficult to...

By James Bourne, 12 February 2018, 0 comments. Categories: Economy, Regulation, Research.

Cloud outages could cost US businesses $15 billion, says Lloyd’s of London

Here’s an interesting statistic to illustrate how much influence the major cloud providers have: according to Lloyd’s of London, US businesses could lose $15 billion if a leading vendor experienced downtime of at least three days.

According to the insurer, working in partnership with risk modelling firm AIR Worldwide in its ‘Cloud Down’ report, an ‘extreme cyber incident’ which took a top cloud provider offline for three to six days would also result in insured losses of...

By James Bourne, 24 January 2018, 0 comments. Categories: Data & Analytics, Disaster Recovery, Infrastructure, Regulation, SLA.

Amazon Web Services opens second Chinese data centre region in collaboration with NWCD

It appears Amazon Web Services (AWS) is continuing a presence in China after all: the company has announced a strategic technology partnership with Ningxia Western Cloud Data Technology (NWCD), opening a second data centre in China in the process.

The AWS China (Ningxia) region, which offers two availability zones at launch, complements the Beijing region Amazon already has. Like the Beijing region, which is

By James Bourne, 12 December 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Data Centres, Infrastructure, Regulation.

Cloud Standards Customer Council publishes latest guide to cloud computing

The Cloud Standards Customer Council (CSCC) has published the latest version of its Practical Guide to Cloud Computing, which aims to give organisations a 10-step roadmap from developing business cases to moving to production.

The report, version 3.0, makes several changes to its predecessor, which was published in 2014, including updates to address maintaining cloud services and data residency management. As well as this, the ‘essential characteristics’ of cloud computing, opening the document,...

By James Bourne, 06 December 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Adoption, Industry, Infrastructure, Regulation, Research.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation adds Bloomberg and Morgan Stanley among 30 new members

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), a San Francisco-based organisation aimed at sustaining containers and microservices architectures, has secured 30 new members, including Bloomberg, Morgan Stanley, and Qualcomm.

The new members are all at the silver level, while six other companies have joined at the end user member and end user supporter level, including GitHub, Reddit, and The Wikimedia Foundation.

Membership had been swelled in the past few months with the arrival of major cloud providers such as Microsoft

By James Bourne, 23 October 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Containers, DevOps, Microservices, Platform, Regulation.