Google adds per-second billing to Compute Engine, Container Engine and App Engineā€¦ ahead of AWS

Amazon Web Services (AWS) may have been the first of the major cloud vendors to announce per-second billing, but Google has become the first to implement it.

The company announced yesterday that customers of Compute Engine, Container Engine, Cloud Dataproc, and App Engine flexible environment virtual machines (VMs) will move to the new system, applicable to all VMs.

Google’s change was made effective as of September 26, while AWS customers will have to wait until October 2 for their move. Google...

By James Bourne, 27 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Developers, Economy, Google, Platform.

MongoDB sets up to go public, reveals $101m yearly revenues in filing

Database provider MongoDB has filed to go public, confirming reports from a month previously and potentially becoming the third major cloud IPO of 2017 after Okta and Cloudera.

The SEC filing, available to view here, shows MongoDB made $101.4 million in total revenues in the year ending January 31 2017, up 55% from the previous year’s $65.3m, which was up 37% from 2014-15’s $40.8m. Despite total gross profit of $71.4m, total...

By James Bourne, 22 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Data & Analytics, Developers, Economy, M&A.

AWS launches per-second billing for EC2 and EBS services

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is to move to a per-second billing model for its EC2 and EBS services from October 2.

The move aims to go one step ahead of its competitors, Microsoft, Google et al, who have been since 2013 been utilising per-minute billing for its services.

Given the developments of products such as AWS Lambda, among others in the serverless realm, it makes sense to make the shift. AWS said many of its customers had been ‘dreaming up applications’ for EC2 that utilised a larger number...

By James Bourne, 19 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Amazon, Developers, Storage.

Two in three DevOps engineers in US make $100k, argues new Puppet survey

If you want to get ahead – and get better paid – in the cloud game, then chuck in the sysadmin role and become a DevOps engineer instead.

That’s the primary finding from Puppet’s 2017 DevOps Salary Report, which finds that 66% of DevOps engineers and 69% of software engineers in the US take home pay packets of more than $100,000 per year – up 2% and 3% respectively from the year before – while sysadmins on six figures were only at 31%.

Naturally, this disparity lent itself...

By James Bourne, 13 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Developers, DevOps, Economy.

Enterprise container adoption remains slow despite the hype, research argues

Enterprise interest in container technologies continue to grow, but adoption has not gone up with it, according to a report from the Cloud Foundry Foundation.

The Global Perception Study report, which polled more than 540 enterprise developers across different industries, found that only 25% of organisations polled were using containers in 2017, up only 3% from 22% in 2016. There was, however, a greater uptick in companies evaluating options, at 42% from 31% in 2016.

Perhaps this is somewhat to be expected;...

By James Bourne, 11 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Containers, Developers, Kubernetes, Platform, Research.

How cloud and DevOps combine for software delivery success

Throughout the global economy and across all industries, companies are re-inventing themselves to become better at sensing the next big thing their customers need, and finding ways to deliver it to get ahead of the competition.

The concept of DevOps dates back nearly 10 years now. During this time, a lot has changed. As DevOps has matured, we have seen many successful implementations, lessons learnt and copious amounts of data gathered. One thing that remains unchanged to this day – DevOps is...

By Mike Adcock, 04 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Developers, DevOps, Infrastructure, Security.

New York Times moves gaming and crossword platform to Google App Engine from AWS

“Cloud computing platform as a service, recently adopted by the New York Times (6, 3, 6)”

The New York Times has announced it has moved its games platform to Google App Engine from Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Having first published its daily crossword in 1942, the NYTimes built its first website in 1996, with the digital daily crossword starting life as a web-based Java applet. Since then, the publisher has overseen growth into a suite of mobile apps and a website with more than 300,000 paid...

By James Bourne, 01 September 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Amazon, Case Studies, Developers, Google, Platform.

Lack of specialist server skills hampering organisations, finds 451 Research

More organisations are looking to hire server-based IT staff; but finding employees who can work across both traditional servers and converged infrastructure is increasingly tough.

That is the verdict of analyst firm 451 Research in its latest Voice of the Enterprise study, which finds that for two thirds of the more than 500 firms surveyed, recruiting for roles across both sectors is difficult. A similar number (67%) say the primary driver for more server-related employees is business growth, with 42% citing...

By James Bourne, 22 August 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Developers, Infrastructure, Research.

Why analytics and good identity hygiene are key to cloud security

As cloud computing has matured, the benefits it delivers to organisations of all sizes are undeniable. Companies are enjoying agility, scale and speed like never before.

And cloud adoption shows no signs of slowing. Gartner earlier this year forecasted that the worldwide public cloud services market would grow 18 percent in 2017, and Forrester said global cloud services revenues totalled £100 billion in 2016, up from £50 billion just two years ago — that’s annual growth of 30...

By Don Shin, 15 August 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Data & Analytics, Developers, Security, Vulnerabilities.

Getting the balance right in microservices development

Choices, choices, choices. User requirements and non-functional requirements are just the beginning of the balancing act of services development. New development paradigms usually take a few years before their practitioners get a handle of the factors that they need to balance.

In the case of microservices, this balancing act comes down to three things: granularity, data consistency, and performance. The most usable and best-performing services built on the microservices architecture will find a balance of...

By David Auslander, 04 August 2017, 0 comments. Categories: Architecture, Containers, Data & Analytics, Developers, Microservices, Platform.